Insurance the ten rule!!!
  • If you are playing on a single deck game and off the first deal you see two hands that don't have a ten in them insurance is a good bet. In a double deck game you need to see 5 hands with no ten in them for it to be a good bet. On the shoe game insurance is never a good bet of the first deal.
    To insure a blackjack on a single deck game you need to see no more tens in 5 or 6 hands which can be done if the other players at the table are friendly and flash their cards too you.
  • learningtocount said:
    If you are playing on a single deck game and off the first deal you see two hands that don't have a ten in them insurance is a good bet. In a double deck game you need to see 5 hands with no ten in them for it to be a good bet. On the shoe game insurance is never a good bet of the first deal.
    To insure a blackjack on a single deck game you need to see no more tens in 5 or 6 hands which can be done if the other players at the table are friendly and flash their cards too you.


    That simply violates basic card counting 101... Suppose you see two hands with no 10's, but you see three hands with 2 tens each. Still going to insure on that dealer ace? I'm not unless the two hands have more total low cards than the 6 tens I saw exposed... Or in my case, unless the true count is at the right point to insure (varies slightly depending on number of decks in play).

    Count cards and you can get this right. Forget about looking at single hands. It doesn't work and is just a "ploppy play"...
  • learningtocount said:
    If you are playing on a single deck game and off the first deal you see two hands that don't have a ten in them insurance is a good bet. In a double deck game you need to see 5 hands with no ten in them for it to be a good bet. On the shoe game insurance is never a good bet of the first deal.
    To insure a blackjack on a single deck game you need to see no more tens in 5 or 6 hands which can be done if the other players at the table are friendly and flash their cards too you.

    Yes, In a single deck game just after the shuffle, if on your hand and another player's hand you see no ten card you have a positive expectation on the insurance bet. Anytime the ratio of non-tens/tens is 2:1 or less you have the edge in the insurance bet.
    But you cannot accomplish this using Hi-Lo. To play the insurance perfect you have to use the Ten Count. But that is a different story all together.
  • When I wrote the statements that I did about how many hands you would have to see without see a ten I assumed that I did not see any other hands.
    After the intial 5 cards that you see without a ten two player hands and the dealer up card of an ace. You need to see about 4 non-tens for every ten that you see.
  • learningtocount said:
    When I wrote the statements that I did about how many hands you would have to see without see a ten I assumed that I did not see any other hands.
    After the intial 5 cards that you see without a ten two player hands and the dealer up card of an ace. You need to see about 4 non-tens for every ten that you see.


    You simply need to reach the point where the number of tens to non-tens is 1:2. Since you start off with 4 extra non-tens, you need 4 non-tens to fall to get it to the exact "break even" point where insurance has an EV of 0.0. And since it adds to variance, normally you would wait until the EV swings north after the 5th non-ten falls where you actually have an advantage, rather than just a random 50-50 bet at the exact 1:2 ratio point... If you get 4 non-tens and a ten, you are still in a -EV situation and you should not take insurance.

    Insurance pays 2:1. When the ratio of tens to non-tens is 1:2 it makes it an exact break even bet. You are not quite describing the break even point above...

    HiLo would have you take insurance at just over +1 in that game, some round to +2, some truncate to +1. Either one is a +ev wager.

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