Blackjack switch beatable?
  • Is blackjack switch beatable just by playing it perfectly? It seams like a much more complicated game than regular blackjack. And has some bad rules like push on 22 and blackjacks pay even money. But you can move cards from one hand to another. What is the house edge with perfect play. Can you get a stragedy trainer for this?
  • learningtocount said:
    Is blackjack switch beatable just by playing it perfectly? It seams like a much more complicated game than regular blackjack. And has some bad rules like push on 22 and blackjacks pay even money. But you can move cards from one hand to another. What is the house edge with perfect play. Can you get a stragedy trainer for this?


    wizard has a web page for this. Has a low house edge (lower than normal shoe BJ games). But it has a hellishly complex basic strategy, particularly when to switch...

    http://wizardofodds.com/blackjack/bj_switch.html
  • In blackjack switch the dealer decision to hit or stand on soft 17 is probably a much bigger gain than in regular blackjack, because of the 22 rule. I think when 22 push all hands that 22 might be better for the dealer to get than 17.
    When the dealer busts 22 is the most likely number that he will bust with. How much would the edge increase in a hit soft 17 game? Normal blackjacks games show an increase of .2% but I think in blackjack swith it would be a .5% increase because of push on 22 rule.
    Are there any stragedy trainers for blackjack swith that are a 100% acurate or at least 99% acurate or better?
  • The stragedys on the wizard of odds for blackjack switch don't make any sense at all first of all it only takes in a count for 1 hand instead of 2 and there is a lot of stragedy in switching the cards which it does not cover. And it does not tell you what cards to switch. My guess is the stragedy is so complicated that even a good regular blackjack player will have a hard time learning this game. The stragedys are proably about 10 times more complicated with 2 hands that interact with each other than just one hand.
  • It is a hellishly complicated basic strategy. Why do you think the casinos would offer a game with a smaller theoretical house edge than regular blackjack? Because they know that almost nobody is going to play anywhere near perfectly. And that greatly increases the house edge for almost all players...

    It's a carnival game that ought to be avoided along with 6:5 and the other 21 variants that have come and gone (or come and stayed).
  • stainless steel rat said:
    It is a hellishly complicated basic strategy. Why do you think the casinos would offer a game with a smaller theoretical house edge than regular blackjack? Because they know that almost nobody is going to play anywhere near perfectly. And that greatly increases the house edge for almost all players...

    It's a carnival game that ought to be avoided along with 6:5 and the other 21 variants that have come and gone (or come and stayed).


    I think it's unfair to group 'Blackjack Switch' in with other carnival games that have house edges either around or over 1%. The game at Casino Royale has a house edge of 0.18%.

    Yes it's true that most players will not 'switch' correctly but the added edge to the house would only be around 0.6% for mediocre 'switchers'. While the exact 'switch' strategy is complex there is an easy method that will allow you to perform most of the 'switches'. This would only add around 0.1-0.3% to the house edge.

    So, you end up with a shoe game that has a house edge between 0.28%-0.48%. It's a game where educated players can benefit from the mediocre players unlike some of the Blackjack variants out there. And, unlike other carnival games, it can provide players with a lower house edge than almost every shoe game out there (if you are prepared to learn some simple guidelines).

    It's frustrating when players compare it to 6/5 and gives an unfair impression of the game.

    Incidentally, LTC, you are correct, hitting 'soft 17' in 'Blackjack Switch' has a bigger effect on the house edge. It's worth 0.39%.

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