• i am completely new to blackjack. i'm looking to learn and i'm interested in your thoughts re: where i should start. buy a book? if so, what books do you recommend? i see the books that the site recommends, but do you specifically suggest any of those for a beginner? others that aren't listed? should i just start playing? this doesn't sound like the best choice, but who knows.

    thanks in advance for the help.
  • I'd recommend your first two books be THe Blackjack Zone by Elliot Jacobson and Blackjack Bluebook 2 by Fred Renzey. Both are very beginner friendly and although they take divergent paths will both get you to the same place.
    Welcome and Good Luck.
    Many of these books are available at your local library. But so are some pretty bad ones,as well.
  • NYB said:
    I'd recommend your first two books be THe Blackjack Zone by Elliot Jacobson and Blackjack Bluebook 2 by Fred Renzey. Both are very beginner friendly and although they take divergent paths will both get you to the same place.
    Welcome and Good Luck.
    Many of these books are available at your local library. But so are some pretty bad ones,as well.


    Blackjack Zone? -What's that? ..., You got to be kidding when you recommend Eliot's book. Fred Ranzey is way above many BJ authors.

    How about this,
    "Beat the Dealer" by Edward O. Thorp, PhD
    "The Casino Gambler's Guide" by Dr. Allan N. Wilson
    "Playing Blackjack as a Business" by Lawrence Revere
    "Blackbelt in Blackjack" by Arnold Snyder
    "Blackjack Bluebook" by Fred Renzey

    Get the Basic Strategy ASAP to perfection and go card counting immediately. Don't spend much time playing basic because you will lose money. Try to understand the game in correlation with card counting. Learn how to play every hand against any dealer’s up-card as a function of the count.
    Basic strategy is a losing play. The basic is valid only on the first round after the suffle. The more rounds you penetrate the deck the more error you'll have using basic.
  • Do you really want to play blackjack? How serious and dedicated are you? These two questions are important to answer prior to wasting some of your money on any blackjack adventure.

    Suggestion: Go to the site BJ21.com and to the left of their home page click on blackjack school. This will get you to the 20 or so lessons for bj that starts out with the very basics and progresses to counting and advance play. The school is free and you may be able to download same. This path will allow you to judge your own level of interest and at your own pace. Use your common sense and a large helping of honesty and then you will know.

    Good luck...
  • AlexD30 said:
    Blackjack Zone? -What's that? ..., You got to be kidding when you recommend Eliot's book. Fred Ranzey is way above many BJ authors.

    How about this,
    "Beat the Dealer" by Edward O. Thorp, PhD
    "The Casino Gambler's Guide" by Dr. Allan N. Wilson
    "Playing Blackjack as a Business" by Lawrence Revere
    "Blackbelt in Blackjack" by Arnold Snyder
    "Blackjack Bluebook" by Fred Renzey

    Get the Basic Strategy ASAP to perfection and go card counting immediately. Don't spend much time playing basic because you will lose money. Try to understand the game in correlation with card counting. Learn how to play every hand against any dealer’s up-card as a function of the count.
    Basic strategy is a losing play. The basic is valid only on the first round after the suffle. The more rounds you penetrate the deck the more error you'll have using basic.



    I'd respond,but I'm on a "please don't feed the trolls" bit.
  • NYB said:
    I'd respond,but I'm on a "please don't feed the trolls" bit.


    Why would someone say to buy the Blackjack Zone to a new or almost new player?

    I agree the book does not teach one how to be an advantage player and is pretty much useless to anyone with a minimum of advantage play experience if they have an advantage mindset.

    What the book is good for is helping the new player throw away all the improper advice and superstitions that will easily bury him if he listens to other players and most dealers while at the tables. Used properly, the book can place him in a mindset where he will not only quickly learn basic strategy but follow it and quickly follow by learning to count.

    Now why someone might say to buy this book to anyone who is already an advantage player would be a very hard, perhaps impossible question to answer but I do not think Elliot wrote the book with the advantage player in mind.

    ihate17
  • ihate17 said:
    Why would someone say to buy the Blackjack Zone to a new or almost new player?

    I agree the book does not teach one how to be an advantage player and is pretty much useless to anyone with a minimum of advantage play experience if they have an advantage mindset.

    What the book is good for is helping the new player throw away all the improper advice and superstitions that will easily bury him if he listens to other players and most dealers while at the tables. Used properly, the book can place him in a mindset where he will not only quickly learn basic strategy but follow it and quickly follow by learning to count.

    Now why someone might say to buy this book to anyone who is already an advantage player would be a very hard, perhaps impossible question to answer but I do not think Elliot wrote the book with the advantage player in mind.

    ihate17


    I would suggest AP-types buy the book for one reason. "pleasure reading". Have you re-read any of the old classics (or read them for the first time recently)? Beat the Dealer comes to mind. Won't help you a scintilla in todays games (single-deck dealt to the bottom would be a wonderful game, and Thorpe's "end-play" would be fun. But it won't happen. But the stories about "Greasy John", the cheating dealer mechanics, dealers crying, etc.. All make it worth reading even though it won't help you play better. That is the same reason I would suggest not missing any blackjack books. Mike (Bootlegger's) book fits the same style, where the stories intermingled with BJ information makes it an interesting read for that part alone.

    I really like the older books (million dollar blackjack, the big player, beat the dealer) just ot sit down, relax, and dream about what it would have been like to play back in the 60's/70's/80's knowing what I know today...
  • thanks for the advice. i've started to check into a couple of the suggestions, and i'll continue to look at the others.

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