Playing multiple hands??????
  • Anyone have suggestions on whether to play up to 7 hands when playing against the dealer alone. At home, using the same rules as the casinos in indiana, and the same shuffling and stripping techniques used to shuffle, ive found that if i play seven hands vs one, two, or three, ive come out an average of 20 betting units ahead over the play of several hundred hands...ive kept track of the cards played, the dealers bust rates, and individual cards. Obviously, this doesnt come near to millions of hands played, in computer simulations, but in "cutting edge blackjack", and a few other books that ive read, they all suggest you play at a table with a minimum of 4 players, with 7 being the best because with an average of over 20 cards played per round, no matter what the point the players put the cut card, deeper penetration is allowed with more players.

    Should I play more hands on average at the same time, or just stick to one or two????
  • I haven't heard of ANY casinos allowing you to play all 7 hands, and only in Vegas you can play even 3?! Where I play, Isle you can only play up to 2 so....
  • Play two if you can, no more than that for reasons discussed above.

    BUT, bring double stakes to the table. Maybe you can get away with 1 3/4 times table stakes... no less than that.

    N&B
  • But what's he talking about playing all 7 hands for? I know of no casino that allows you to even play more than 3!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    EVEN BILL GATES WOULDN'T BE ALLOWED TO PLAY ALL 7!
  • Bug- At the casino I play at most, you can play two hands for the table minimum and you can play THREE hands for double the table minimum. So, on a $5 table you could play, two hands for $5.00 each and play Three hands for $10.00 each. Different casinos, different rules......
  • Right, of course different casinos have different rules; that's what I said that some casinos allow 2, or MAYBE 3 at the max, but again, he was talking about playing all 7 hands.... THAT is not possible at ANY casino, now is it?
  • the reason I was asking about 7 hands is because I was watching one individual playing 7 green chip hands against the dealer one on one. There were even a few other players that wanted in...but the dealer asked them how much they would be betting, and if they couldnt match his standard $25 bet, they would have to go to a table with a lower minimum...by the way...he was winning on average 4 out of seven hands. Looked to me like he was cleaning the house...
  • Dude, WHERE AT.... because again, for the 3rd time I have never heard of ANY casino even in VEGAS where one could do that... how about some details on where you "saw" this happening because I'd be right there in a heartbeat betting 7 hands $25 each.
  • I've seen 3 hands and more played several times. Each place will have their own rules for what the minimum per hand is going to be. I once watched a well known, heavily tatooed, now retired basketball player play every spot at two adjoining tables at Mirage. They had both tables roped off so no one could get in. Best recollection was he was playing about $5,000 at each of either 12 or 14 spots.
  • Wow... very interesting... so what other places offer the ability to play the ENTIRE TABLE like that cuz I'd want to get in some of that action!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Only in Vegas or what?

    Hah... so what was he doing, just walking to each and every hand the entire time? Hah...
  • Keep in mind, you're going to be playing alot more than the table minimum. I think the rule of thumb is 2x minimum for 2 hands; 5x table minimum for 3 hands, and more as you go up.

    Yep, he just walked from spot to spot and then to the next table. All the chairs were removed except one at each table so he could sit down during shuffles. Pretty entertaining.
  • For a card counter, the more hands you can get away with, the better. If you do it right, it will reduce your variance, and leave your EV the same. On a practical basis, two hands is the limit. More hands will draw attention and have a decreasing impact on variance. Of course, if you can afford 14 hands of $5000 each, and you're not card counting, do whatever the hell you want!

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!