more noob questions
  • Hi all,

    Been busy so I wasn't able to get here as often as I'd like. :(

    More dumba**ed questions:

    1. What do you do to memorize Basic in the most complete way, in the shortest possible time? I realize that there will be lots of different answers to this, which is what I'm looking for.

    2. Does progression betting give you that much advantage? To me, the "Martingale" system doesn't make sense. Upping one's bet after a loss would be what the casinos want because you're pissing away money on a losing streak, nu?

    3. Do you have to be an expert at math to profit from BJ? [note: this is the make-or-break question. I'm an artist & always have been, so as you'd expect, numbercrunching isn't my strong suit.]
  • The Mad Pencil said:
    Hi all,

    Been busy so I wasn't able to get here as often as I'd like. :(

    More dumba**ed questions:

    1. What do you do to memorize Basic in the most complete way

    2. Does progression betting give you that much advantage?

    3. Do you have to be an expert at math to profit from BJ?


    As for 1: Keep playing, use a simulation, and practice, practice & more practice. Print out a chart and keep it in front of you, don't deviate from it, and play it until you know it cold.

    2: I'm partial to progressions. I've been trying just about all the methods, since around August or so, except for counting, and I've found the progression, notably the Labby method, to be well worth it. I just keep going back to it because it performs the best, IMHO.

    3. Don't worry about being an expert in math. Rather, an expert in common sense. Two rules of common sense: Strictly adhere to Basic Strategy, and set a loss limit and keep to it religiously.

    Just my .02

    Oh, and also, read this forum often. The info you get here, just can't be found anywhere else!
  • 3. Don't worry about being an expert in math. Rather, an expert in common sense. Two rules of common sense: Strictly adhere to Basic Strategy, and set a loss limit and keep to it religiously.


    On that last one: Jeezus in a turnip, yes! As I said, I'm not a math geek & probably never will be (unless I can figure out how to install circuits from a 3-buck calculator in my brain), so the loss limit is the only protection I have when the cards go against me. I do play a simulation but am not impressed with it. (Blackjack Trainer for Windows) The &)*#@$%ing thing keeps making a mistake every so often: Making my hand stand when I hit. Although it isn't often the mistake surely throws off the outcome of the game.

    I am also skeptical because no simulation can mirror casino conditions completely. But as I'm not about to piss away $$hundreds$$ in the course of learning, I settle for the sim. Someone once said "Experience may be the best teacher, but it's also the most expensive."

    The Mad Pencil
  • Mad Pencil- jm2552 gave you some good advice. Read 1 & 3 again. You should study and pratice basic strategy "for the game you will be playing" i.e. 2-2 vs 2 do you hit or split ? With 6 decks you split and in a 2 deck game you do not. If you are going to be playing the 6 deck game, use the chart under Rules & Strategy, on this site. You will probably have the most trouble learning the "soft" hands and when to split. You can use the simulation on this site, either normal or difficult game. Make up some tests, like A-7 vs 3 __ 5-4 vs 6 __ 3-3 vs 3 (etc), anything less than 100% Keep Studying........
  • Another good way to remember the soft doubles is described in Renzey's book as "The rule of 9". Reading his book might also convince you that you CAN add a little advantage to your basic strategy game, even if you are not a math whiz. I don't understand some of the math behind some of the things I do, but I do trust it.
  • Mad Pencil-The only thing I can add is even after you have BS memorized, still carry a basic strategy chart with you. I've had BS memorized for over a year and there's still the odd time when I'll brain fart and be like "what am I supposed to do with this hand"? It helps to have the chart right there.

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