Why does the house have an advantage?
  • Why does the house have an advantage?

    If they are trying to accomplish the same objective as I am (get as close to 21) with the same deck of cards and if we get the same number it's a push. I know there's something I'm not looking at so that's why I ask.
  • There are several favourable rules that you have that the house does not:
    3:2 on blackjack
    ability to double
    ability to split
    ability to stay when your total is less than 17
    etc.

    but the reason the house has the advantage is: YOU ACT FIRST

    i.e. You can bust before the house does anything and if you and the house both bust, the house still takes your $$.
  • Oh, OK, I get it..

    Makes sense... thanks.
  • Skunk said:
    There are several favourable rules that you have that the house does not:
    3:2 on blackjack
    ability to double
    ability to split
    ability to stay when your total is less than 17
    etc.

    but the reason the house has the advantage is: YOU ACT FIRST

    i.e. You can bust before the house does anything and if you and the house both bust, the house still takes your $$.


    yup, that is the biggest reason, absolutely
  • If you bust and the dealer bust too the house wins this is an example of a tie won by the house!!! Say you have 6 people at the table all betting 100 dollars a hand the dealer shows a 7 and 3 people bust there hands they all lose. Now the dealer turns over his card and finds a 6 he hits and gets a 10 the dealer bust and pays the remaining player having a net lose of zero on a hand where he busted. Where as a player will have a net loss of everything he bets everytime he busts. That happens about 5% of the time!
    Every other rule favors the player but does not gain as much as the 5% such as being able to split pairs, and being able to double down. However these have to be excuted properly for the player to gain.
    The house usually gains from inexperienced players making moves that are mathimatically incorrect!

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!