First time betting the ramp with KISS I
  • Well our little crime lab took one of its bi-monthly trips to Mississippi thursday and my scheduele cleared enough for me to make it this time. I've been practicing enough on the KISS I drills on Rob Toughers site to try out a count. The six deck at Sam's Town in Tunica is not the best game in the area but thats where the bus went so I played there. Dealer hits soft 17, DAS, resplit the aces, hand shuffle and there was only one five doller table open. The game started out terrible, I was able to keep the count easily but it didn't stay good at all and sure enough my results followed the count, dropped 18 units fairly quickly. Was not playing my usual progression but it wouldn't have done any good anyway since I was losing at least 80% of the hands. Then a shoe hit and the count soared to 25 and I went from 1 unit to 6. In five hands I lost 1 six unit bet and won 4 six unit bets plus a double to make it back to even plus very quickly. The next shoe didn't show promise and as it was my first time I called it a day and went to lunch. One very interesting thing happened, the dealer was placing the cut card at 1 deck when I started a very good penetration probably reflecting the time of day and trying to get as many hands per shoe as possible, he took notice of my increase in bets by just a stare, but the very next shoe increased the cut to about 1 2/3 deck. At lunch I had a couple of glasses of wine and then back counted some tables, was not able to keep the count at all, lesson learned. Played one more table at straight flat bet for a five unit profit and had to play the Elvis slot machine which I got lucky on and took a nice profit home in a short visit. The KISS I count is very easy to keep on tables with 3 or 4 players, on a full table you need to practice until it becomes second nature. But it is going to be hard for me to just use a simple progression now as I am convinced of the power of the count. One other drill has been helpful, on HitorStand I keep a count, and am getting to the point where my BS plays are automatic without thinking, the only problem is when I have to hit multiple cards, adding those up I lose track of the count.
  • Thanks for the trip report, Doc. Glad it went well for you.
  • Doc -- I've been working at the KISS II level, because I found it more distracting to ignore the 10s (ie the actual ten spot card) and 3s than to count them. One thing that makes me stumble sometimes is trying to ignore the red deuces while counting the black ones. Are you finding that?
  • At first yes, but after a while the black twos just start calling out to you in thier own special way. Thats where Robs site has helped, I see a black 2 now after playing hundreds of drills its look is just different from the red 2s which I don't even see. Having done this in a casino now I have noticed that while the drill is great at developing a rote ability to recognize which cards are counted, it doesn't help you establish a good pattern of organization when the cards are being dealt to 5 or 6 players on a real table, the drill's pattern of dealing is different so thats something I'll have to work on.
  • Doc said:
    At first yes, but after a while the black twos just start calling out to you in thier own special way. Thats where Robs site has helped, I see a black 2 now after playing hundreds of drills its look is just different from the red 2s which I don't even see. Having done this in a casino now I have noticed that while the drill is great at developing a rote ability to recognize which cards are counted, it doesn't help you establish a good pattern of organization when the cards are being dealt to 5 or 6 players on a real table, the drill's pattern of dealing is different so thats something I'll have to work on.


    Doc -- To help with counting practice, I suggest getting the Hoyle Casino software by Sierra Entertainment. You are a virtual player at a table with three others. The cards get dealt like they would at a real table. I do an interim count when everyone gets their initial two cards and the dealer's up card, and then a final count as the hits/busts/stands progress around the table. You can also turn on a box in the upper right that keeps the running and true counts in the hi-lo system, just for comparison. You choose the rules, number of decks, percentage penetration, speed of play, whether the other players talk (and how much), background casino noise level, etc. Cost is about $15 to $20 at places like CompUSA. You'll recognize the other virtual players as stereotypes that you see at the tables, especially in Vegas. Except for one key difference -- they always play strictly correct basic strategy, because the intention is to teach you that.

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