Personality types and Blackjack
  • Blackjack Books

    Like most of you I have read a lot of blackjack books and
    I've wondered why none of them try to evaluate the player
    personalities. We all know from table observations that some
    individuals should not be in the Casino much less at the blackjack
    table. I'm sure, many of you are very much aware of the four
    basic personality types and can nail them at the table in a matter
    of minutes. These poor individuals are totally unaware of their
    situation and personally, I feel sorry for them. Freds book hightlights
    some of these inherent faults (myths) but I think any new release
    could include a section/chapter on this subject. This, I think, would
    add great value to the game knowledge base. Consider these two
    personality types: ENTP vs ESFJ.. Both are extraverted and this
    makes no difference. The "N" vs "S" is a major difference and it goes
    like this: N sees the future, the possibilities, he knows what your
    thinking before you do. S is in the "here and now"; likes structure and
    a work plan. T is for thinker and this individual thinks first. F is
    for feelings and this individual places a bet based on his feelings.
    Finally, P vs J. P is an observant scholar, he sees other options
    where others don't. J is for judgemental; third base is killing us all.

    So what do we have? Well we can see two very different individuals
    with very different skills that are inherent/natural/who they are and
    the difference is absolutely stark in any gambling situation. There
    are no bad personality types. Its just that each has his own set of
    skills and idiosyncrasies unique to self.
  • This post slipped by me but contains some really interesting ideas. I
    should start by saying that in scientific, academic circles, Myers Briggs personality typing and other personality systems are generally dismissed as being neither reliable (results are statistically inconsistent when tests are repeated) nor valid (tests do not measure what they purport to measure). However, these tests are interesting and stick around because they seem to hold some general truths for those of us who have taken them.

    The tests notwithstanding, if we assume that the sixteen personality types do exist and represent 85% of the people out there in the gambling universe, it would be interesting to know what types make better gamblers and what types born losers. Theoretically, one could modify his own behaviors to mimic those of the winning personality.

    Or just blow it all off and use a simple counting system.
  • zebra said:
    ...if we assume that the sixteen personality types do exist and represent 85% of the people out there in the gambling universe, it would be interesting to know what types make better gamblers and what types born losers. Theoretically, one could modify his own behaviors to mimic those of the winning personality.

    Or just blow it all off and use a simple counting system.


    Good stuff, Ray and Zebra. My Comments: (1) counters are probably a different personality type than non-counters; (2) some of the 16 different personality types probably never set foot in a casino.
  • Dog and Zebra, About the only traits that I think we can identify
    without being subjective and argumentive are "feelings" and the
    tendency to be "judgemental". These stand out like a sore thumb
    and we don't need a test to see that. I think you will agree that these
    types, very likely, will not make the grade. It may be that good
    gamblers and good card counters have the same distinguishing
    traits. Could it also be possible that an excellent card counter may
    in fact be a poor gambler? In my original post, I identified the "N"
    vs "S" type and I'm of the opinion that this area; these attributes,
    may be the key identifier but, thats just an opinion.

    Ray

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